Discussion:
Big beers in Georgia
(too old to reply)
bluestringer
2004-07-25 14:35:18 UTC
Permalink
I'm in South Georgia and I haven't seen any of the big beers that the law is
allowing now. My local retailer keeps telling me they are coming, but I
think he is just putting me off. Anyone in Georgia seen any yet? I'm sure
Atlanta has them.


bluestringer
Rajendra Gondhalekar
2004-08-03 04:26:37 UTC
Permalink
You are correct Atlanta has a lot of them. For people in South Georgia, a
trip to Jacksonville, FL is needed.
Post by bluestringer
I'm in South Georgia and I haven't seen any of the big beers that the law is
allowing now. My local retailer keeps telling me they are coming, but I
think he is just putting me off. Anyone in Georgia seen any yet? I'm sure
Atlanta has them.
bluestringer
Eric Gibson
2004-08-05 01:11:14 UTC
Permalink
Post by bluestringer
I'm in South Georgia and I haven't seen any of the big beers that the
law is allowing now. My local retailer keeps telling me they are
coming, but I think he is just putting me off. Anyone in Georgia seen
any yet? I'm sure Atlanta has them.
Yep! I live in Atlanta, and I went to the grocery store yesterday and noticed that
there were all these new beers in .75 liter wine-type bottles... I looked on one,
and it said "8% alcohol by volume"... Which seemed odd, because I thought it was
illegal. I had no idea this law was passed until I looked it up on AJC's website. (I
read news on google, so I don't get a lot of local stories)

Anyway... The only thing I've tried so far is "La Chouffe"... It's excellent. I'm
going to a couple liquour store tonight to get some others. I don't even know what
to look for though... One of my friends from Ireland said the Guiness Special is 10x
better than the "shit" that's sold here... I'm going to see if I can find some.

Eric
Rajendra Gondhalekar
2004-08-05 04:16:18 UTC
Permalink
Guinness Foreign Export Stout is not sold in the US. Only in the Caribbean.

As for the new beers, you should visit one of the two Green's Beverage
Discount Store locations to get a look at the marvelous new selection
available. The pick of the bunch IMHO are:

Rogue Imperial Pale Ale
Rogue Old Crustacean
J. W. Lees Vintage Harvest Ale (older the vintage the better)
St. Bernardus Abt. 12
St. Bernardus Trippel
Unibroue La Fin du Monde
Unibroue Trois Pistoles
Duvel
Orval
Wetmalle Trippel
Rochefort 10
Ayinger Celebrator Dopplebock
Schneider Aventinus
Samuel Smith Imperial Stout
Post by Eric Gibson
Post by bluestringer
I'm in South Georgia and I haven't seen any of the big beers that the
law is allowing now. My local retailer keeps telling me they are
coming, but I think he is just putting me off. Anyone in Georgia seen
any yet? I'm sure Atlanta has them.
Yep! I live in Atlanta, and I went to the grocery store yesterday and noticed that
there were all these new beers in .75 liter wine-type bottles... I looked on one,
and it said "8% alcohol by volume"... Which seemed odd, because I thought it was
illegal. I had no idea this law was passed until I looked it up on AJC's website. (I
read news on google, so I don't get a lot of local stories)
Anyway... The only thing I've tried so far is "La Chouffe"... It's excellent. I'm
going to a couple liquour store tonight to get some others. I don't even know what
to look for though... One of my friends from Ireland said the Guiness Special is 10x
better than the "shit" that's sold here... I'm going to see if I can find some.
Eric
bluestringer
2004-08-07 02:35:07 UTC
Permalink
Post by Rajendra Gondhalekar
Guinness Foreign Export Stout is not sold in the US. Only in the Caribbean.
As for the new beers, you should visit one of the two Green's Beverage
Discount Store locations to get a look at the marvelous new selection
Rogue Imperial Pale Ale
Rogue Old Crustacean
J. W. Lees Vintage Harvest Ale (older the vintage the better)
St. Bernardus Abt. 12
St. Bernardus Trippel
Unibroue La Fin du Monde
Unibroue Trois Pistoles
Duvel
Orval
Wetmalle Trippel
Rochefort 10
Ayinger Celebrator Dopplebock
Schneider Aventinus
Samuel Smith Imperial Stout
Damn, we'll never get stuff like that here in South Georgia. We don't even
get Sam Adams Double Bock. Maybe Columbus has some, I'll check next time I'm
up there.
--
bluestringer
VROC #13910
04 500LTD
Rajendra Gondhalekar
2004-08-07 15:38:03 UTC
Permalink
Post by bluestringer
Damn, we'll never get stuff like that here in South Georgia. We don't even
get Sam Adams Double Bock. Maybe Columbus has some, I'll check next time I'm
up there.
How close are you to Jacksonville, FL? The GWCB website
(http://www.worldclassbeer.org/) lists Paradise Alley on the Ocean as one of
the best places to buy high gravity beers (at least it was until HB645 came
into effect). They are supposed to have three coolers full of Belgian
beers. I have never been there, but that may be the best choice for you.
Thei information is:

Paradise Alley on the Ocean
831 N. 1st Street
Jacksonville, FL 32250

(904) 246-2837
bluestringer
2004-08-08 02:04:23 UTC
Permalink
Post by Rajendra Gondhalekar
Post by Rajendra Gondhalekar
Guinness Foreign Export Stout is not sold in the US. Only in the
Caribbean.
Post by Rajendra Gondhalekar
As for the new beers, you should visit one of the two Green's Beverage
Discount Store locations to get a look at the marvelous new selection
Rogue Imperial Pale Ale
Rogue Old Crustacean
J. W. Lees Vintage Harvest Ale (older the vintage the better)
St. Bernardus Abt. 12
St. Bernardus Trippel
Unibroue La Fin du Monde
Unibroue Trois Pistoles
Duvel
Orval
Wetmalle Trippel
Rochefort 10
Ayinger Celebrator Dopplebock
Schneider Aventinus
Samuel Smith Imperial Stout
Damn, we'll never get stuff like that here in South Georgia. We don't even
get Sam Adams Double Bock. Maybe Columbus has some, I'll check next time I'm
up there.
--
bluestringer
VROC #13910
04 500LTD
Well, I spoke too soon. Went to my package store today and they had Duvel, 3
or 4 different brews from Ommegang, John Courage, and some other stuff. I
picked up a bottle of the Ommegang Belgian Style Ale and a six of the John
Courage. I just finished the Ommegang and I must say it is the best beer I
have ever tasted, but of course I haven't tried many because they were never
available here and I rarely get out of town. Looking forward to trying a lot
more now.
--
bluestringer
VROC #13910
04 500LTD
Eric Gibson
2004-08-08 22:45:40 UTC
Permalink
[snip]
Duvel
I tried the golden ale from them last night... It's really good. It's wierd, because
I usually like the darker/more flavorful of the commercial pasteurized beers I've
ever drank. But I'm finding I like the lighter ales of the new stuff I'm trying...
The darker tripels, like this "Ommegang" from NY I drank last night are a little too
much for me right now.

Eric
Rajendra Gondhalekar
2004-08-10 04:19:48 UTC
Permalink
Tripels are not dark. They are quite light looking and fruity, but have a
pretty high alcohol content. Among Belgian beer styles , Singles (more
commenly called Belgian Pale Ales) and Tripels (sometimes called Belgian
Strong Pale Ales) are light golden colored, while Dubbels (which are
somewhat like a Porter) and Quadrupels (Sometimes called Belgian Strong Dark
Ales) are dark colored.
Post by Eric Gibson
[snip]
Duvel
I tried the golden ale from them last night... It's really good. It's wierd, because
I usually like the darker/more flavorful of the commercial pasteurized beers I've
ever drank. But I'm finding I like the lighter ales of the new stuff I'm trying...
The darker tripels, like this "Ommegang" from NY I drank last night are a little too
much for me right now.
Eric
Joris Pattyn
2004-08-10 06:00:35 UTC
Permalink
Post by Rajendra Gondhalekar
Tripels are not dark. They are quite light looking and fruity, but have a
pretty high alcohol content. Among Belgian beer styles , Singles (more
commenly called Belgian Pale Ales) and Tripels (sometimes called Belgian
Strong Pale Ales) are light golden colored, while Dubbels (which are
somewhat like a Porter) and Quadrupels (Sometimes called Belgian Strong Dark
Ales) are dark colored.
Sorry, no.
That is present-day BJCP nonsense.
Tripel is light-coloured TODAY, because Westmalle tripel, light to amber,
is so popular.
Dubbel is Dark coloured, because Westmalle dubbel, dark, became so popular.
In history, those designations were just degrees of higher OG.
"Single" is only used by two breweries, one of them because Anglo-Saxons are
bewildered by the name "Stimulo".
"Quadrupel" is a commercial gimmick by La Trappe.
Not more than 20 years ago, the Tripel van 't Hamerken, direct precursor to
Brugse Tripel, was jet-black.

Why do you need pigeon-holes so much? And think that is whatever is in
fashion now, has always been so?

JorisP
Lew Bryson
2004-08-10 16:45:31 UTC
Permalink
Post by Joris Pattyn
Why do you need pigeon-holes so much? And think that is whatever is in
fashion now, has always been so?
So, so, SO well-said! Thanks, Joris.
--
Lew Bryson

www.LewBryson.com
Author of "New York Breweries" and "Pennsylvania Breweries," 2nd ed., both
available at <www.amazon.com>
The Hotmail address on this post is for newsgroups only: I don't check it,
or respond to it. Spam away.
Rajendra Gondhalekar
2004-08-11 04:21:12 UTC
Permalink
I am not well versed in Belgian beer history, and what you said about the
different styles may be true from a historical sense. However every Tripel
I've had to date (whether from a Trappist, or non Trappist Belgian source,
or brewed elsewhere in the Belgian Style), has always been a light colored
but strong brew. So unless someone was drinking beer out of old historic
bottles from some cellar, or had found some obscure currently produced beer
labeled as a Tripel that is dark, he couldn't really make a statement like
"The darker tripels, like this "Ommegang" from NY I drank last night are a
little too much for me right now.".

To strengthen my argument, take the fact that Ommegang is not even listed as
a Triple on either ratebeer or BeerAdvocate. The correct style category for
it is Belgian Strong (Dark) Ale. In a perfect world unclear designations
like Single, Dubbel, Tripel, Quadrupel will vanish and clear qualitative
style titles like Belgian Pale Ale, Belgian Dark Ale, Belgian Strong Pale
Ale, and Belgian Strong Dark Ale will replace them, But based on current
practices, these terms are somewhat interchangeable, and the shorthand
titles are sometimes more common than the proper descriptive style titles.
So when I order a Tripel, get me a light strong beer, otherwise it's going
back to the bar. If I wanted a dark beer, I'd have ordered a Belgian Strong
Dark.

Cheers.
Joris Pattyn
2004-08-11 06:04:12 UTC
Permalink
Post by Rajendra Gondhalekar
clear qualitative
style titles like Belgian Pale Ale, Belgian Dark Ale, Belgian Strong Pale
Ale, and Belgian Strong Dark Ale will replace them,
This is the reasoning fault I "attacked" you for. WHY for all that is good &
beery, do you need "clear qualitative style titles" for? Unless - granted -
for a homebrewers' competition (which I don't like anyway)?
ESPECIALLY in "Belgian" styles.
Consider this: if our Belgian brewers (I'm Belgian, if you didn't guess
already) had thought along those pigeon hole-guidelines, do you think they
would have earned the international admiration they have today? As MJ said,
"the most ideosyncratic" in the world.
Belgian styles developped regionally: brown sourish beers around Oudenaarde,
Roeselare, Aarschot (all considerably different) - or a bit more
bitter-sweet around Diest. Stong, pale blonde ales in the Antwerpen
province. "British" amber ale types in "Klein-Brabant". And of course the
lambic beers at Payottenland, or the Saisons from western-Hainaut. Etc.
But even IN those styles, every brewer had his own little secret, jealously
guarded in the family, and he considered the ways of the brewer in the next
village as invariably inferior to his own. And they kept experimenting.
There's only 2 real lambikblenders "stekers" left, today, but until the
fifties, the blender was the big man. pre-war, every second farmer in the
Payottenland made some lambic. Blenders came around in the village, testing
the different pipes, and choose those they thought to be of enough quality
for blending purposes. All the time, variations crept in - and then I could
go on on the different harvests of fruit...
If we read about your guidelines concerning "Belgian" styles, I don't know
if I have to laugh or to weep. WHAT Belgian styles, for chrissakes?
I have a suggestion for you:
classify them in future following the #number of Wyeast used...
Joris
Lew Bryson
2004-08-11 13:16:59 UTC
Permalink
Post by Rajendra Gondhalekar
To strengthen my argument, take the fact that Ommegang is not even listed as
a Triple on either ratebeer or BeerAdvocate. The correct style category for
it is Belgian Strong (Dark) Ale. In a perfect world unclear designations
like Single, Dubbel, Tripel, Quadrupel will vanish and clear qualitative
style titles like Belgian Pale Ale, Belgian Dark Ale, Belgian Strong Pale
Ale, and Belgian Strong Dark Ale will replace them,
This is a troll, right?
--
Lew Bryson
"I do not at all resent criticism, even when, for the sake of emphasis, it
for a time parts company with reality." -- Winston S. Churchill
www.lewbryson.com
Author of "New York Breweries," and "Pennsylvania Breweries," 2nd ed.,
available at
http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/0811728986/qid=964395194/sr=1-2/103-7272174-3121415
Joel
2004-08-11 13:29:26 UTC
Permalink
Post by Lew Bryson
Post by Rajendra Gondhalekar
To strengthen my argument, take the fact that Ommegang is not even listed
as
Post by Rajendra Gondhalekar
a Triple on either ratebeer or BeerAdvocate. The correct style category
for
Post by Rajendra Gondhalekar
it is Belgian Strong (Dark) Ale. In a perfect world unclear designations
like Single, Dubbel, Tripel, Quadrupel will vanish and clear qualitative
style titles like Belgian Pale Ale, Belgian Dark Ale, Belgian Strong Pale
Ale, and Belgian Strong Dark Ale will replace them,
This is a troll, right?
I certainly hope so. But there are people out there who really
believe stuf like that. (You can usually tell who they are when
they take the ratings of online hobbyist forums very seriously.)
--
Joel Plutchak "I am myself, and if I have to hit my head against a
plutchak at [...] brick wall to remain true to myself, I will do it.”
- Marlon Brando
Joel
2004-08-11 13:17:31 UTC
Permalink
Post by Rajendra Gondhalekar
To strengthen my argument, take the fact that Ommegang is not even listed as
a Triple on either ratebeer or BeerAdvocate.
I don't quite know how to break this to you, but citing
online forums like those holds zero (0) weight, either
authoritatively or statistically.
--
Joel Plutchak "I am myself, and if I have to hit my head against a
plutchak at [...] brick wall to remain true to myself, I will do it.”
- Marlon Brando
Rajendra Gondhalekar
2004-08-11 23:05:22 UTC
Permalink
I was not trying to troll, and am sorry to have offended anyone's feelings.
I am completely ignorant about the history of beer in Belgium and am glad
that such innovation is found in such a small country.
Post by Joel
Post by Rajendra Gondhalekar
To strengthen my argument, take the fact that Ommegang is not even listed as
a Triple on either ratebeer or BeerAdvocate.
I don't quite know how to break this to you, but citing
online forums like those holds zero (0) weight, either
authoritatively or statistically.
--
Joel Plutchak "I am myself, and if I have to hit my head against a
plutchak at [...] brick wall to remain true to myself, I will do it.”
- Marlon Brando
Lew Bryson
2004-08-12 04:48:58 UTC
Permalink
Post by Rajendra Gondhalekar
I was not trying to troll, and am sorry to have offended anyone's feelings.
I don't think anyone was offended. Skeptical, perhaps even dismayed, but it
takes a lot to offend us. Piddie, for example.
--
Lew Bryson

www.LewBryson.com
Author of "New York Breweries" and "Pennsylvania Breweries," 2nd ed., both
available at <www.amazon.com>
The Hotmail address on this post is for newsgroups only: I don't check it,
or respond to it. Spam away.
Nick Dempsey
2004-08-12 01:21:11 UTC
Permalink
Post by Joel
Post by Rajendra Gondhalekar
To strengthen my argument, take the fact that Ommegang is not even listed as
a Triple on either ratebeer or BeerAdvocate.
I don't quite know how to break this to you, but citing
online forums like those holds zero (0) weight, either
authoritatively or statistically.
I don't even think the RateBeer community takes those particularly
seriously; there are a number of categories like "Belgian Strong Dark"
or "Premium Lager" that are pretty much catch-alls for beers that
brewers don't pigeonhole themselves.

--NPD
Joris Pattyn
2004-08-12 07:16:10 UTC
Permalink
Post by Nick Dempsey
I don't even think the RateBeer community takes those particularly
seriously; there are a number of categories like "Belgian Strong Dark"
or "Premium Lager" that are pretty much catch-alls for beers that
brewers don't pigeonhole themselves.
You've said it. I partake a lot in Ratebeer - because it's fun, not because
I think it needs to exert authority - but I take those categories with a
sackful of salt each. If it's Belgian, and pretty strong - well, it's gonna
be a Belgian Strong ale. If it says "tripel" - it's gonna be tripel. But the
beer could be both.
But I do think that:
- if a beer has a certain number of ratings, one can form some kind of idea
about the beer you've just found
- even with little ratings, you can try to find some that are a bit better
written to get some amount of info on the beer concerned
And then there's lots of other info, as well as articles.
I think both Usenet groups, as sites as Ratebeer or BeerAdvocate, as well as
other forums can participate in offering more info on beer to anybody
looking for it.
My two Eurocents, Joris
Joel
2004-08-12 13:31:19 UTC
Permalink
Post by Joris Pattyn
- if a beer has a certain number of ratings, one can form some kind of idea
about the beer you've just found
- even with little ratings, you can try to find some that are a bit better
written to get some amount of info on the beer concerned
Oh, agreed. One can make broad conclusions based on such
ratings. But I've seen enough people who take the numbers
very seriously that I have a strong desire to counteract
that nonsense. E.g., "That's the second-best beer in the
world!!1!111!" (Said of the high-gravity hop-monster of the
week on one of those sites.)
--
Joel Plutchak "I am myself, and if I have to hit my head against a
plutchak at [...] brick wall to remain true to myself, I will do it.”
- Marlon Brando
Rajendra Gondhalekar
2004-08-13 02:34:52 UTC
Permalink
But personally I like all of those high IBU high gravity monsters, whether
they rate high on these sites or not.
Post by Joel
Post by Joris Pattyn
- if a beer has a certain number of ratings, one can form some kind of idea
about the beer you've just found
- even with little ratings, you can try to find some that are a bit better
written to get some amount of info on the beer concerned
Oh, agreed. One can make broad conclusions based on such
ratings. But I've seen enough people who take the numbers
very seriously that I have a strong desire to counteract
that nonsense. E.g., "That's the second-best beer in the
world!!1!111!" (Said of the high-gravity hop-monster of the
week on one of those sites.)
--
Joel Plutchak "I am myself, and if I have to hit my head against a
plutchak at [...] brick wall to remain true to myself, I will do it.”
- Marlon Brando
Joel
2004-08-13 14:15:41 UTC
Permalink
Post by Rajendra Gondhalekar
But personally I like all of those high IBU high gravity monsters, whether
they rate high on these sites or not.
See? That's my point.
--
Joel Plutchak "I am myself, and if I have to hit my head against a
plutchak at [...] brick wall to remain true to myself, I will do it.”
- Marlon Brando
Rajendra Gondhalekar
2004-08-14 00:57:12 UTC
Permalink
Post by Joel
Post by Rajendra Gondhalekar
But personally I like all of those high IBU high gravity monsters, whether
they rate high on these sites or not.
See? That's my point.
--
I am not sure what you mean by that.
Post by Joel
Joel Plutchak "I am myself, and if I have to hit my head against a
plutchak at [...] brick wall to remain true to myself, I will do it.”
- Marlon Brando
Bruce in Cleveland
2004-08-15 01:28:17 UTC
Permalink
Post by Rajendra Gondhalekar
Post by Joel
Post by Rajendra Gondhalekar
But personally I like all of those high IBU high gravity monsters,
whether
Post by Joel
Post by Rajendra Gondhalekar
they rate high on these sites or not.
See? That's my point.
--
I am not sure what you mean by that.
I think Joel's point is that Taste and preferences are an individual thing, and all a
rating site will show you is what most people who rated the particular item think of it
Post by Rajendra Gondhalekar
Post by Joel
Joel Plutchak "I am myself, and if I have to hit my head against a
plutchak at [...] brick wall to remain true to myself, I will do it.�
- Marlon Brando
Oh, Guess
2004-08-12 04:30:23 UTC
Permalink
On Wed, 11 Aug 2004 00:21:12 -0400, "Rajendra Gondhalekar"
Post by Rajendra Gondhalekar
[...]
To strengthen my argument, take the fact that Ommegang is not even listed as
a Triple on either ratebeer or BeerAdvocate.
Attempting to appeal to authority by citing online sites where
amateurs - inspired amateurs, perhaps, but amateurs nonetheless -
are the "experts" does nothing to enhance your credibility.

Give it up, and quit trying to pigeonhole beers so much. The new
extended limit on beer alcohol percentages in Georgia should be
your cue to enjoy new styles, not try to stifle them with over-
categorization.
--
Nobody You Know
Rajendra Gondhalekar
2004-08-13 02:39:29 UTC
Permalink
I do love to try as many different beers as I can get my hands on without
making the wife too mad. I do not want the odd quirky beers to go away at
all. Categorization to me is beneficial for the sake of labeling, so that
consumers have a rough idea what they may be getting. However, if a brewer
brews something that is different and does not fit any style, that's
probably one of first beers I'd pick up to check out.
Post by Oh, Guess
On Wed, 11 Aug 2004 00:21:12 -0400, "Rajendra Gondhalekar"
Post by Rajendra Gondhalekar
[...]
To strengthen my argument, take the fact that Ommegang is not even listed as
a Triple on either ratebeer or BeerAdvocate.
Attempting to appeal to authority by citing online sites where
amateurs - inspired amateurs, perhaps, but amateurs nonetheless -
are the "experts" does nothing to enhance your credibility.
Give it up, and quit trying to pigeonhole beers so much. The new
extended limit on beer alcohol percentages in Georgia should be
your cue to enjoy new styles, not try to stifle them with over-
categorization.
--
Nobody You Know
bluestringer
2004-08-14 18:16:33 UTC
Permalink
Post by Rajendra Gondhalekar
Tripels are not dark. They are quite light looking and fruity, but have a
pretty high alcohol content. Among Belgian beer styles , Singles (more
commenly called Belgian Pale Ales) and Tripels (sometimes called Belgian
Strong Pale Ales) are light golden colored, while Dubbels (which are
somewhat like a Porter) and Quadrupels (Sometimes called Belgian Strong Dark
Ales) are dark colored.
I don't know anything about all that. This is my first time trying these
Belgian Ales and all I know is damn, they are good. Just tried a Corsendonk,
very tasty indeed.

bluestringer
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